Q

How to get training on OpenDaylight controllers and APIs

David Goldberg explains the origins of OpenDaylight controller code and offers resources for developers looking to learn more about the existing code base.

How can I become trained in using OpenDaylight controllers and APIs?

Just three months after the formation of the OpenDaylight project, the community approved controller code and began

accepting contributions for add-on components like mapping services for flow management.

The controller strategy, known as the Dixon-Erickson proposal, combines elements of contributed code from Big Switch, Cisco, and other project members. The controller design is based on a service abstraction layer that uses the Java interface language Open Service Gateway Initiative (OSGi) with common open application programming interfaces (APIs) to enable plug-ins for modular applications.

In some cases, these applications, or "bundles," will be key controller features like network virtualization. However, they will live externally or beside the core controller. Other features, like user authorization, will be incorporated into the controller. Above that layer is an open northbound API where other applications can be built.

There are a lot of ways to participate and gain technical knowledge in an open source project like OpenDaylight. For developers looking to learn the existing code base, the OpenDaylight Wiki is a great place to start. To connect with other members of the OpenDaylight developer community, conversations in the mailing lists, or on the #opendaylight IRC channel at freenode.net, are open for anyone to join.

There is also a growing list of video resources on YouTube for developers, network architects and end users who are looking to start testing and integrating the OpenDaylight controllers and APIs.

The Ask.OpenDaylight forum is another developer resource used to post technical questions for community feedback and opinion. OpenDaylight will also begin hosting training classes to further grow the community and get users up and running on the controller.

This was first published in June 2014

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